History articles

Victory Parade, August 1945 – “106 minutes of wild cheering”

Victory Parade, August 1945 – “106 minutes of wild cheering”

By Dr Cheryl Griffin The War in the Pacific was over and despite cold and rain, Melbournians turned out in force to celebrate. It had rained for 90 minutes before the parade of 20,000 service personnel and other war workers marched through the CBD in the early afternoon of Friday, August 24, 1945. “It’s on!”

Intersection of Swanston and Flinders streets, looking north, 1890s

By Dr Cheryl Griffin At first glance there is little that is familiar about this street scene taken some time in the early 1890s. The traffic is dominated by horses and carts. The pedestrians cross without streetlights to guide them. Public transport consists of cable trams, a relatively recent innovation. The roads are in poor

St James Buildings, Bourke St frontage, 1959

By Dr Cheryl Griffin – Royal Historical Society Victoria The eastern sections of Bourke St and Collins St are well documented and known for the ambience and fine architecture found in areas such as the “Paris end” of Collins St. But this picturesque scene featuring a long-gone St James St is at the other end

Flinders St from Yarra Bank, 1950

By Dr Cheryl Griffin – Royal Historical Society of Victoria Taken in the first decade after the end of World War II, this view from Yarra Bank Rd on the south bank of the Yarra River looks towards Flinders St from King St to William St and finally Market St.  This is probably a less

An early Melbourne high-rise

By Dr Cheryl Griffin – Royal Historical Society of Victoria Looking at this streetscape today, the 11-storey building that dominates the left side (the south side) of this early 1950s photograph of Bourke St raises no eyebrows.  It is the Commonwealth Bank Building at 219-225 Bourke St and in its day it was something of

A winter’s walk in Fitzroy Gardens, 1913

By Dr Cheryl Griffin – Royal Historical Society of Victoria It’s a stark but beautiful winter scene in one of Melbourne’s oldest parks, a landscape laid bare. The skeletal elm trees stand like proud sculptures extending skywards, their shadows creating faint stripes of light and shade along the pathway in the silvery sunlight.  This is

Making way for thoroughly modern Melbourne

By Dr Cheryl Griffin – Royal Historical Society of Victoria (RHSV) This photograph, taken in about 1924, represents a time capsule of Melbourne as it was just after World War One.  The city was on the cusp of a building revival as a society recovering from the devastating effects of war looked towards its future

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